Taking Baby Steps to Success

Kehinde Eniola, MD, MPH

Kehinde Eniola, MD, MPH

It takes baby steps; do not be in haste to accomplish your goal. And when it seems your goal is unattainable, never give up.

This motto is what I lived by during my journey as an immigrant from Nigeria on my way to becoming a family medicine faculty member.

My baby step to success began back in 1997 while getting ready for college in Nigeria. I was enrolled in a predegree course in basic science with the intention of getting into college to study agricultural economics. However, as fate would have it, I completed my predegree course with excellent grades and I qualified to enroll in medical science.

In my first year, I quickly realized that it takes a devoted mind and a committed heart to be successful in the field of medicine. And on top of the rigors of medical school, I endured years of studying in the dark due to inadequate electricity supply and frequent school closure due to rioting and lecturer strikes. However, despite all the hardship, I was focused on one goal: becoming a medical doctor. In 2006, I graduated from medical school and shortly after I relocated to the United States.

One might wonder “why relocate to the United States after completing medical school?” Right after medical school, I applied to various medical institutions in Nigeria for a medical internship position. After multiple attempts to get into one of these institutions failed, I decided to relocate to the United States to further my medical education. Many questions crossed my mind: What if I do not pass the required licensing exam to further my medical career in the United States? What if I cannot afford to pay for the licensing exams? What if… What if…  Some international medical graduates say that it is challenging to get into a residency program; others recommended going for a nursing program instead, to make ends meet while trying to get into a medical residency program. Despite my fear, I summoned courage and began the process of getting into a US residency program. 

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Family Medicine Educators Need to Lead on Eliminating Race-Based Medicine

Andrea K. Westby, MD

Andrea K. Westby, MD

The practice of medicine—the traditions, diagnoses, treatments, and guidelines—is ever-changing, with new research and information flowing into clinical care at a pace that rivals the turbulence and abundance of a mountain stream in the spring. We now acknowledge human papillomavirus infection as the primary driver of cervical and now oropharyngeal cancer. Hormone replacement therapy is no longer routinely recommended for postmenopausal women. Rate control is preferred over rhythm control in atrial fibrillation. Prostate cancer screening is no longer reflexively ordered for adult men.

However, as we look back at the past hundred years, our profession has been glacially slow to release the vice grip that the concept of biological race has had on our science and our medical practice.

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Going “Glocal” in Yuma Arizona: How to Introduce Global Health Into Family Medicine Curriculum

By Natalia V. Galarza, MD and Kristina Diaz, MD

Global health has been identified as an increasing field of interest in medicine. As Koplan et al, mention, it can be thought as a notion, depending on current events. A definition for global health has never really been reached by consensus, and so it seems that global health can be adapted to the necessities of the location and time.

Many definitions touch on the fact that global health should improve health and achieve equity for all people and protect against global threats that disregard national borders.(1,2) It has deep connections with public health, blurring the boundaries between public health and global health. Within these connections, we have “border health” as a unique part of public health, with many characteristics being shared with the broader “global health.” For family medicine residency programs that are geographically located near the United States-Mexico border, the teaching of border health is embedded seamlessly in the medical resident education, so much that we tend to diminish its importance and gravitate toward other subjects of public and global health. It is easy to overlook the unique populations that we have in our own communities and focus on those that are more conventional and shared with other residency program or educational goals.

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