Category Archives: Research

Democratizing the Conversation for Greater Good: Social Media Usage at Academic Conferences

By Chris Morley, PhD, Ben Miller, PsyD,  and Mark Ryan, MD

Recently, there has been some discussion about whether the sharing of information presented during academic conferences via social media is appropriate, taking form in both peer-reviewed literature1–4 and in online blogs5 and social media, with a particular focus on Twitter.

Predictably, there are arguments presented against the sharing of material via social media that frequently center on the protection of copyrights, patents, intellectual property, or simply ideas-in-formation. Other arguments tend to fret over whether the sharing of a table, figure, or text, presented in a conference, may somehow represent prior publication that might interfere with the ability to later incorporate the same text into a formal journal publication. The crux of either argument tends to be that the presenter has shared information in one form, but that any sharing of that information beyond that context without the presenter’s express permission infringes upon intellectual property rights and/or future publication possibilities.

This antiquated view of information sharing is in need of disruption. Academia, of all, should learn a thing or two about the need to stay relevant in a day and age where people learn of their news from Twitter. It really puts things in perspective when one considers that most academicians wait 8–12 months (or longer!) for a peer-review process to be complete to allow them to share their findings. Conferences have long been one of the best ways to allow for academicians to share their findings with a broader audience while waiting on the laborious and lengthy peer-review process to complete.

However, should we take it as far as to tell people to not tweet what they hear or see at a conference?

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Qualitative Research: How an Educational Project Changed the Way I Think About Research

Joanna L Drowos DO, MPH, MBA

Joanna L Drowos DO, MPH, MBA

Approximately 60 seconds into the jubilation over my acceptance to the prestigious Harvard Macy Institute Course for Educators in the Health Professions, I came to the stark realization that I would now need to develop a scholarly project at my own institution. Though somewhat daunting as a junior faculty member at a very young medical school, this presented an exciting opportunity to gain more knowledge and experience in medical education.

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Grabbing Ahold of the Research Ropes

Kyle Bradford Jones, MD

Kyle Bradford Jones, MD

One of the most common challenges faced by new faculty is how to get a good handle on research. The transition to academic medicine is a difficult one, whether coming directly out of residency or from a different practice setting. It can often present confusion on expectations and how to achieve your desired goals.

If you are anything like me, you were likely a little naïve about what may be required to pull off successful research projects. Dealing with the internal review board (IRB), leading a research team, understanding the ins and outs of applying for grant funding, properly fulfilling IRB and grant requirements after approval, knowing the best place to submit your manuscript, dealing with publishers and editors, and other steps in the process can cause anxiety and confusion.

To avoid anxiety and confusion as you start your research and career, seek out a mentor, collaborate wisely, pursue your interests, learn all that you can about the funding game, and be persistent.

Seek mentorship

The importance of a good mentor cannot be overstated. Finding someone, preferably at your own institution, can help with many of the little things that you may not anticipate. A mentor at your home institution can steer you to someone who knows how the local IRB works or to someone who can ensure your grant is submitted properly. Even understanding the differences between the types of grants, such as an R18 or R21, and which one may best fit your level of expertise and type of research can be invaluable and save you a lot of time. It is ideal if your mentor is in a similar research area. However, due to the competitive nature of research, some colleagues in your home institution may prefer not to be a mentor.

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