Category Archives: Medical School

One of Those Kids in That Class Is Me and They Deserve a Chance

Crichlow_R_2015

Renee Crichlow, MD

In the last couple of years, I have been a co-teacher in an undergraduate program part of whose mission is to increase underrepresented in medicine (URM) students in our medical school. There are many reasons I have chosen to do this and to fully understand, I thought it would be important to share a little bit of my student career history.

To begin, nothing in here is about bragging. It’s really about sharing a story that may be similar to what others have seen.

My high school was a very high performing public school: we had 13 National Merit Scholars in the year I graduated, and I was one of them. (Except at that time in 1985 my award was called National Merit Outstanding Negro Scholar. I’m not joking. That’s exactly what it was called in 1985.) I mention this because it’s an indication of the fact that I would have been considered a very high-capacity, high-potential performer for college.

For many reasons that I won’t go into, there was no family support for me either financially or socially to enter college. So I found a way to get to college by myself. Eventually, I decided to stay in the town that I grew up in and went to school at Oklahoma University.

In order to afford food and books, I had to work night shifts at Hardee’s, closing the restaurant quite late. I didn’t have a car so if my friend couldn’t pick me up I walked back to campus. I worked multiple nights each week and carried a full credit load. I would say my grades there were mediocre at best. By the end of the first semester, it was clear to me that I was very bored staying in the same town that I grew up in. I went to the large pile of brochures that I’d been sent after winning National Merit Outstanding Negro Scholar award and I chose to apply to Boston University because it had rolling admissions and would accept me based on my ACT and SAT scores alone as my GPA was not very impressive. I ended the year with about a 3.2.

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Believing in Our Stories and in Our Field

Megan M Chock, MD, MPH

Megan M Chock, MD, MPH

Mariana’s commitment to her community, love of learning, and sincere support inspired me to become a family physician. This blog post is my way of thanking her and showing the influence she’s had on me and my journey and goals in family medicine.

It was an early fall evening in Rochester, Minnesota, and I was trying to put on my newest possession, a big black down-filled coat which made me feel twice as wide and five times as clumsy. I stumbled into the workroom of our free smoking cessation clinic at the local Salvation Army, shrugging the glorified sleeping bag over my shoulders. It was 2010 and I was in my first year of medical school, still trying to figure out how to layer against the cold.

“Hey, are you from Hawaii?”

I turned around, almost knocking over the objects behind me, and saw a smiling, brown-eyed, brown-haired young woman, maybe a few years older than me. “Um–yeah…?”

“Hi, I’m Mariana!”

This was my introduction to Mariana Cook-Huynh, one of the most influential people in my journey to family medicine.

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From Journalism to Medicine: Not Such a Huge Leap After All

Ranit Mishori, MD, MHS

Ranit Mishori, MD, MHS

Now that I have stacked up a good number of years in medical practice, I am one of those doctors who gets asked from time to time to talk about my career with medical students and junior physicians, answering questions about how I chose my specialty, how I like life in academia, and how I balance being a doctor, a spouse, and a mother.

Part of my answer always includes my late start in the field. I was nearly 30 when I decided to give up on a life in journalism and go back to school and become a doctor.  For a decade before that, I was a newswoman, a radio producer, and then a TV producer and editor, and I worked in Jerusalem, New York, and London. I covered wars, natural disasters, politics, terror attacks, international affairs, and some fluff stories as well. Yes, I must confess: skateboarding squirrels, surfing dogs, and high-heel races are some of the memorable news stories I shared with the world.

And when I share this, the most common comment I get is some variation of, “Wow, journalism to medicine sounds like 180 degrees!”

I thought so too at the time I started making the switch. But eventually I found it not to be a radical change at all. To the contrary, my decade in news prepared me well—better than any of the required organic chemistry or physics courses—for a life as a medical doctor.

Here’s why:

It’s all about storytelling.

One of the things that many students feel most nervous (and excited) about in the first 1 to 2 years of medical school is interviewing patients. This is what we call in medicine taking a history: a process that is at least as important as doing a physical examination. Indeed, I would argue that its impact is often greater than diagnostic testing or lab results in reaching a diagnosis and creating management plans.

For me, history taking felt like being back out on a story, behind the camera, getting the facts and making them make sense. Doing this well, in either context, is an art in itself: knowing when to press, when to let go, asking open ended questions, letting silences linger, paying attention to what’s not being said. These are crucial skills that we, as medical educators, try to teach medical students from year one to the end of their training and beyond. And they were skills I acquired in journalism.

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